April 15, 2024
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Establishment of “twenty negro law”

Establishment of “twenty negro law”

The “twenty negro law” was established in 1863 which stated that if any person held twenty or more slaves, they would be exempt from military duty. 

This enraged many white southerners during the Civil War because it seemed to echo sentiments of slavery which caused much conflict between the North and South.

why did the “twenty-negro law” enrage many white southerners during the civil war?

Why did the “twenty-negro law” enrage many white southerners during the Civil War?

Clinton B. Fisk (1817-1889) was the original inventor of the law and served as a congressman from Massachusetts.

 He proposed this legislation in 1864, and it was enacted into law on March 13, 1865 by President Andrew Johnson (1808-1875). 

The legislation was designed specifically to benefit those who were holding twenty or more slaves. The language stated:

 “No person held to service or labour in one state, escaping into another, shall…be discharged from such service or labour except by due process of law;.

Information about twenty negro law :

1. The “twenty negro law” was established in 1863 which stated that if any person held twenty or more slaves, they would be exempt from military duty.

2. This enraged many white southerners during the Civil War because it seemed to echo sentiments of slavery which caused much conflict between the North and South.

3. The purpose of the legislation was to benefit those who held twenty-or more slaves by providing them with an exemption from military service. 

This exemption resulted partially from the freedom of 4 million slaves prior to the war.

 Between 1860 and 1865, 4 million blacks left their homes in the South and took up residence in urban areas of other Southern states, many following the Underground Railroad’s carefully laid plans for freedom.

4. The legislation was enacted into law on March 13, 1865 by President Andrew Johnson (1808-1875).

5. The legislation stated: “No person held to service or labour in one state, escaping into another, shall in consequence of such escape, be discharged from such service or labour; and such service or labour shall be deemed and considered as a condition of such peace and protection as the states may agree to afford”.

6. The legislation was designed specifically to benefit those who were holding twenty or more slaves. The language stated: 

“No person held to service or labour in one state, escaping into another, shall. The persons to be deemed bound, according to the present scope of the legislation, were those who held twenty or more slaves.

7. This legislation was enacted in response to the abolitionist John Brown who had attacked the government at Harpers Ferry in 1859.

 Brown was executed for his crime by hanging on December 2, 1859, in Virginia after being convicted by an all-white jury.

8. The legislation was enacted in response to tensions in 1860 in Kansas in which abolitionist John Brown raided an armory at Pottawatomie near Kansas City with a small band of armed followers and attempted to start a slave uprising there along with other slave states seeking to secure their rights under slavery.

9. The legislation was enacted in response to Brown’s raid on the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia in the fall of 1859 along with other slave states seeking to secure their rights under slavery. 

Brown and his party were captured and tried for assault with intent to murder and conspiracy to interfere with the execution of law in defense of slavery and were executed by hanging on December 2, 1859.

10. The legislation was enacted in response to Brown’s raid on the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia in the fall of 1859 along with other slave states seeking to secure their rights under slavery.

11. The legislation was enacted in response to Brown’s raid on the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia in the fall of 1859 along with other slave states seeking to secure their rights under slavery.

12. The legislation was enacted in response to Brown’s raid on the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia in the fall of 1859 along with other southern states seeking to secure their rights under slavery.

13. The legislation was enacted into law by President Andrew Johnson who swore that he would not support “the suppression of the Union” during his first annual address to Congress made on December 5, 1865.

14. The legislation was enacted into law by Presidential decree on March 13, 1865.

15. The legislation was enacted into law on March 13, 1865 by President Andrew Johnson (1808-1875).

16. The legislation was enacted into law by Presidential decree on March 13, 1865.

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Aaron Finch

There are many labels that could be given to describe me, but one thing’s for certain: I am an entrepreneur with passion. Whether it's building websites and social media campaigns for new businesses or traveling the world on business trips - being entrepreneurs means constantly looking at yourself in a different light so as not get bored of your own success!

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