June 21, 2024
Business World

How World War I started and the reason behind the war?

How World War I started and the reason behind the war?

How World War I started and the reason behind the war?

The war that swept across Europe and into Africa in 1914 was a global catastrophe. It raged from the opening battle of August 1, 1914, to the November 11 Armistice on the Western Front.”

“What caused World War I?”

World War I was a result of an unresolved dispute over territory involving Serbia and Austria-Hungary.

 In July 1914, following a number of incidents between Serbia and Austria-Hungary around Kosovo which had violated Serbian sovereignty, the Austrian-Hungarian Government delivered to Serbia an ultimatum making impossible terms for Serbian acceptance.

 Serbia, being a small state, had little choice in the matter.

However, Russia, an ally of Serbia and France, were outraged by this ultimatum and threatened Austria-Hungary with war. 

Therefore the Austro-Hungarian Government declared war on 1 August 1914. Germany soon followed suit and so did the British Empire on August 3rd 1914. 

The Germans would go to war against Austria-Hungary to secure their colonies in Southwest Africa which they felt obligated to protect (known as South-West Africa or Namibia) after ruling that area since 1884.

What is the best summary of the first paragraph of “how we entered world war i”?

1. What was the reason behind the war-the beginning of World War I?

The war that swept across Europe and into Africa in 1914 was a global catastrophe. It raged from the opening battle of August 1, 1914, to the November 11 Armistice on the Western Front. 

In all, more than 16 million military personnel were mobilized; an estimated 10 million combatants were killed, along with 6 million civilians.

 Never before had there been such a complete breakdown in civilization

Entire cities and towns, not to mention battlefields, were wrecked beyond recognition by modern warfare’s ruthless tactics of mass bombardment from afar through airplanes and artillery shells. 

The civilian populations from London to St. Petersburg breathed gas masks and endured freezing winters.

2. Why did it start?

World War I was a result of an unresolved dispute over territory involving Serbia and Austria-Hungary.

 In July 1914, following a number of incidents between Serbia and Austria-Hungary around Kosovo which had violated Serbian sovereignty, the Austrian-Hungarian Government delivered to Serbia an ultimatum making impossible terms for Serbian acceptance. 

Serbia, being a small state, had little choice in the matter. However, Russia, an ally of Serbia and France, were outraged by this ultimatum and threatened Austria-Hungary with war. Therefore the Austro-Hungarian Government declared war on 1 August 1914. 

Germany soon followed suit and so did the British Empire on August 3rd 1914.

 The Germans would go to war against Austria-Hungary to secure their colonies in Southwest Africa which they felt obligated to protect (known as South-West Africa or Namibia) after ruling that area since 1884.

3. What had happened in the previous month?

In July 1914, following a number of incidents between Serbia and Austria-Hungary around Kosovo which had violated Serbian sovereignty, the Austrian-Hungarian Government delivered to Serbia an ultimatum making impossible terms for Serbian acceptance. 

Serbia, being a small state, had little choice in the matter. However, Russia, an ally of Serbia and France, were outraged by this ultimatum and threatened Austria-Hungary with war.

 Therefore the Austro-Hungarian Government declared war on August 1st 1914, Germany joined in and so did the British Empire on August 3rd 1914.

 The Germans would go to war against Austria-Hungary to secure their colonies in Southwest Africa which they felt obligated to protect (known as South-West Africa or Namibia) after ruling that area since 1884.

4. Explain why World War I was so destructive?

Never before had there been such a complete breakdown in civilization. 

Entire cities and towns, not to mention battlefields, were wrecked beyond recognition by modern warfare’s ruthless tactics of mass bombardment from afar through airplanes and artillery shells. 

The civilian populations from London to St. Petersburg breathed gas masks and endured freezing winters.

5. What were the impacts of the war on civilians? Detailed-What happened to the civilians?

Impacts Of WWI On Civilians: 

The War touched every aspect of everyday life and changed it completely during this time period. 

First and foremost, the war was devastating for the civilians. Most of the people had little idea of what was happening in Europe and little desire to know. 

These were ordinary lives, full of family and friends who were away during this time. The conflict directly affected their lives as it grieved them over loved ones that had been killed or injured and worried about their safety. 

The war also changed how they lived which included everything from work to hobbies to even bedtimes.

6. Give an example of the impact on children living in London during World War I

Children In London During WWI:

The war affected all aspects of a child’s life, especially his/her education. 

Children felt the loss of their friends, who had been involved in the war, and could spend hours crying because they knew when the war finally ended, they wouldn’t see them again. 

This was very traumatic to the children and they were traumatized by it. One day one of these children was sent away to school a little early so that no one would see him cry, although he did and his teacher saw this.

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Aaron Finch

There are many labels that could be given to describe me, but one thing’s for certain: I am an entrepreneur with passion. Whether it's building websites and social media campaigns for new businesses or traveling the world on business trips - being entrepreneurs means constantly looking at yourself in a different light so as not get bored of your own success!

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