February 6, 2023
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Minor traffic violations will fall off of your driving record

Minor traffic violations will fall off of your driving record

Driving records are public information, accessible to anyone who knows where to look. most minor violations will drop off of your driving record after

You can drive without distractions, tailgating, or speeding with impunity until you commit a major traffic violation. 

Once you do that, records of smaller violations will fall off your driving record after five years. 

Understand that this means that the more minor violations you accumulate before then,

 the one big ticket or accident is going to stay on your record for longer—and insurance companies may charge a higher rate accordingly.

In fact, Minor traffic violations can remain on your driving record even after the five-year mark. 

There are a number of situations where a minor violation can stay because it’s considered a “civil infraction.”

New York State Department of Motor Vehicles Commissioner David J. Cagney has proposed a change to New York State’s motor vehicle laws. 

The bill would allow the DMV to permanently delete convictions for moving violations that have been successfully completed—

that is, either paid out or dismissed, with no penalty assessed. (“Rehabilitation” payments would be allowed.) 

A conviction for habitual offender status also could be deleted.

However, the bill would not delete criminal convictions—including those resulting in probation or jail time. 

Those would be separate offenses entirely because they are considered different crimes. 

And the bill does not allow for the deletion of convictions resulting from crashes (such as speeding violations due to racing, or DWI/DUI).

What “permanently” means is that if someone loses their license for any reason other than alcohol-related driving, 

that conviction will no longer count against their driving record. 

If they’re arrested again, their new offense would start its own five-year clock. These changes could apply to anyone convicted after September 2012.

The bill, S.6176, has been approved by the Senate and will head to the Assembly for consideration. 

New York State Assembly members can spare us from any more traffic tickets. 

Take this easy step to protect your driving record:

Phone: (518) 457-1771 or (518) 457-1769 TDD: (518) 474-8100 

Fax: (518) 474-8210 Email: [email protected]

STATE SENATE BILL S.6176

Sponsors: Senators David A. Valesky (D-Oneida), 

James L. Seward (R-Maine), John A. DeFrancisco (R-Onondaga)

A07664 Text: “S6176A.01”

Date Introduced: Jan 24, 2013

Date Referred To Transportation; Rules; Crime Victims, Crime and Corrections; Investigations and Government Operations; Aging; Energy and Telecommunications; Codes

Date Reported: Jun 11, 2013

Passed Senate: Jun 25, 2013 Date Received by Assembly: Aug 20, 2013 

Referred to Assembly Committee on Transportation 

No tickets for minor traffic violations will fall off your driving record

Minor traffic violations can remain on your driving record even after the five-year mark. 

There are a number of situations where a minor violation can stay because it’s considered a “civil infraction.”

 New York State Department of Motor Vehicles Commissioner David J. Cagney has proposed a change to New York State’s motor vehicle laws. 

The bill would allow the DMV to permanently delete convictions for moving violations that have been successfully completed—

that is, either paid out or dismissed, with no penalty assessed. (“Rehabilitation” payments would be allowed.

 A conviction for habitual offender status also could be deleted.

 However, the bill would not delete criminal convictions—including those resulting in probation or jail time. 

Those would be separate offenses entirely because they are considered different crimes.

 And the bill does not allow for the deletion of crashes (such as speeding violations due to racing, or DWI/DUI).

What “permanently” means is that if someone loses their license for any reason other than alcohol-related driving,

 they will no longer count against their driving record.

 If they’re arrested again, their new offense would start its own five-year clock. 

These changes could apply to anyone convicted after September 2012.

The bill, S.6176, has been approved by the Senate and will head to the Assembly for consideration. 

New York State Assembly members can spare us from any more traffic tickets. Take this easy step to protect your driving record:

Phone: (518) 457-1771 or (518) 457-1769 TDD: (518) 474-8100 

Fax: (518) 474-8210 Email: [email protected]

_____ 

No tickets for minor traffic violations will fall off your driving record

Minor traffic violations can remain on your driving record even after the five-year mark. 

There are a number of situations where a minor violation can stay because it’s considered a “civil infraction.” 

New York State Department of Motor Vehicles Commissioner 

David J. Cagney has proposed a change to New York State’s motor vehicle laws. 

The bill would allow the DMV to permanently delete convictions for moving violations that have been successfully completed—

that is, either paid out or dismissed, with no penalty assessed. (“Rehabilitation” payments would be allowed. 

A conviction for habitual offender status also could be deleted. 

However, the bill would not delete criminal convictions—including those resulting in probation or jail time. 

Those would be separate offenses entirely because they are considered different crimes. 

About Author

Aaron Finch

There are many labels that could be given to describe me, but one thing’s for certain: I am an entrepreneur with passion. Whether it's building websites and social media campaigns for new businesses or traveling the world on business trips - being entrepreneurs means constantly looking at yourself in a different light so as not get bored of your own success!

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